Unit Name

Industrial Automation Introduction

Unit Code

ME500

 

Unit Duration

12 weeks

Award

Graduate Diploma of Engineering (Industrial Automation)

Duration: 1 year

 

Master of Engineering (Industrial Automation)

Duration: 2 years

Year Level

1st

Unit Creator/Reviewer

Fraser Maywood

Core/Elective

Core

Pre/Co-requisites

None

Credit Points

3

 

Grad Dip total course credit points = 24

(3 credits x 8 (units))

 

Masters total course credit points = 48

(3 credits x 12 (units) + 12 credits (Thesis))

Mode of Delivery

On-Campus or Online

Unit Workload

10 hours per week:

Lecture - 1 hour

Tutorial Lecture - 1 hours

Practical / Lab - 1 hour (where applicable)

Personal Study recommended - 7 hours (guided and unguided)

             

Unit Description and General Aims

This introduction subject provides the fundamentals of industrial automation used in a range of industry sectors including manufacturing, resources, utilities and transport. The subject covers a range of introduction topics including: electrical and instrumentation theory; safety systems; codes and standards; planning and management automation projects; technical documentation and communications.

Students will undertake case studies of advanced automation projects to introduce how the various topic areas are integrated and implemented in industry.

This foundation subject will act as an introduction to the overall course and the other course units.

Students will be able to elaborate on the design and implementation of industrial automation in projects or operations.

 

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this subject/unit, students are expected to be able to:

  1. Discriminate between the various related engineering disciplines and specialisms, how they function and integrate in order to design, specify, implement and operate industrial automation assets.

Bloom’s Level 6

  1. Demonstrate understanding of electrical theory as it applies to industrial automation

Bloom’s Level 5

  1. Demonstrate understanding of programming, instrumentation and control systems theory as it applies to industrial automation

Bloom’s Level 6

  1. Demonstrate understanding of safety systems as they apply to industrial automation
    Bloom’s Level 5
  2. Demonstrate understanding of regulatory frameworks, codes and standards as they apply to industrial automation including the application of new technology where codes of practices and standards may not exist
    Bloom’s Level 5
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the various industrial data communication techniques and their application in industrial automation
    Bloom’s Level 5
  4. Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of planning, documenting, implementing and project managing industrial automation projects in a business context
    Bloom’s Level 6

 

Bloom’s Taxonomy

The cognitive domain levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy:

Bloom’s Level

Bloom’s Category

Description

Verbs

1

Remember

Exhibit memory of previously learned material by recalling facts, terms, basic concepts, and answers.

Choose, Define, Find, How, Label, List, Match, Name, Omit, Recall, Relate, Select, Show, Spell, Tell, What, When, Where, Which, Who, Why

2

Understand

Demonstrate understanding of facts and ideas by organizing, comparing, translating, interpreting, giving descriptions, and stating main ideas.

Classify, Compare, Contrast, Demonstrate, Explain, Extend, Illustrate, Infer, Interpret, Outline, Relate, Rephrase, Show, Summarize, Translate

3

Apply

Solve problems to new situations by applying acquired knowledge, facts, techniques and rules in a different way.

Apply, Build, Choose, Construct, Develop, Experiment with, Identify, Interview, Make use of, Model, Organize, Plan, Select, Solve, Utilize

4

Analyse

Examine and break information into parts by identifying motives or causes. Make inferences and find evidence to support generalizations.

Analyse, Assume, Categorize, Classify, Compare, Conclusion, Contrast, Discover, Dissect, Distinguish, Divide, Examine, Function, Inference, Inspect, List, Motive, Relationships, Simplify, Survey, Take part in, Test for, Theme

5

Evaluate

Present and defend opinions by making judgments about information, validity of ideas, or quality of work based on a set of criteria.

Agree, Appraise, Assess, Award, Choose, Compare, Conclude, Criteria, Criticize, Decide, Deduct, Defend, Determine, Disprove, Estimate, Evaluate, Explain, Importance, Influence, Interpret, Judge, Justify, Mark, Measure, Opinion, Perceive, Prioritize, Prove, Rate, Recommend, Rule on, Select, Support, Value

6

Create

Compile information together in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern or proposing alternative solutions.

Adapt, Build, Change, Choose, Combine, Compile, Compose, Construct, Create, Delete, Design, Develop, Discuss, Elaborate, Estimate, Formulate, Happen, Imagine, Improve, Invent, Make up, Maximize, Minimize, Modify, Original, Originate, Plan, Predict, Propose, Solution, Solve, Suppose, Test Theory

 

Engineers Australia

The Australian Engineering Stage 1 Competency Standards for the Professional Engineer, approved as of 2013. This table is referenced in the mapping of graduate attributes to learning outcomes and via the learning outcomes to student assessment.

Stage 1 Competencies and Elements of Competency

1.

Knowledge and Skill Base

1.1

Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline.

1.2

Conceptual understanding of the mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics, and computer and information sciences which underpin the engineering discipline.

1.3

In-depth understanding of specialist bodies of knowledge within the engineering discipline.

1.4

Discernment of knowledge development and research directions within the engineering discipline.

1.5

Knowledge of engineering design practice and contextual factors impacting the engineering discipline.

1.6

Understanding of the scope, principles, norms, accountabilities and bounds of sustainable engineering practice in the specific discipline.

2.

Engineering Application Ability

2.1

Application of established engineering methods to complex engineering problem solving.

2.2

Fluent application of engineering techniques, tools and resources.

2.3

Application of systematic engineering synthesis and design processes.

2.4

Application of systematic approaches to the conduct and management of engineering projects.

3.

Professional and Personal Attributes

3.1

Ethical conduct and professional accountability.

3.2

Effective oral and written communication in professional and lay domains.

3.3

Creative, innovative and pro-active demeanour.

3.4

Professional use and management of information.

3.5

Orderly management of self, and professional conduct.

3.6

Effective team membership and team leadership.

 

Graduate Attributes

Successfully completing this Unit will contribute to the recognition of attainment of the following graduate attributes aligned to the AQF Level 9 criteria, Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competency Standards for the Professional Engineer and the Washington Accord and the Program Level Outcomes (PLO):

Graduate Attributes / Program Level Outcomes

(Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, Professional and Personal Development)

EA Stage 1 Competencies

Learning Outcomes

A. Effective Communication (PLO 1)

A1. Cognitive and technical skills to investigate, analyse and organise information and ideas and to communicate those ideas clearly and fluently, in both written and spoken forms appropriate to the audience.

2.2, 3.2

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

A2. Ability to professionally manage oneself, teams, information and projects and engage effectively and appropriately across a diverse range of international cultures in leadership, team and individual roles.

2.4, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6

7

B. Critical  Judgement (PLO 2)

 

B1. Ability to critically analyse and evaluate complex information and theoretical concepts.

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1

2,3,4,5,6

B2. Ability to creatively, proactively and innovatively apply theoretical concepts, knowledge and approaches with a high level of accountability, in an engineering context.

1.5, 2.1, 3.3, 3.4

1, 7

C. Design and Problem Solving Skills (PLO 3)

 

C1. Cognitive skills to synthesise, evaluate and use information from a broad range of sources to effectively identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

1.5, 2.1, 2.3

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

C2. Technical and communication skills to design complex systems and solutions in line with developments in engineering professional practice.

2.2, 2.3

1, 7

C3. Comprehension of the role of technology in society and identified issues in applying engineering technology ethics and impacts; economic; social; environmental and sustainability.

1.5, 1.6, 3.1

1,5,7

D. Science and Engineering Fundamentals (PLO 4)

D1. Breadth and depth of mathematics, science, computer technology and specialist engineering knowledge and understanding of future developments.

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4

1,5,7

D2. Knowledge of ethical standards in relation to professional engineering practice and research.

1.6, 3.1, 3.5

5, 7

D3. Knowledge of international perspectives in engineering and ability to apply various national and International Standards.

1.5, 1.6, 2.4, 3.4

1,5,7

E. Information and Research Skills (PLO 5)

E1. Application of advanced research and planning skills to engineering projects.

1.4, 2.4, 3.6

5, 7

E2. Knowledge of research principles and methods in an engineering context.

1.4, 1.6

5,7

       

 

Unit Content and Learning Outcomes to Program Level Outcomes (PLO) via Bloom’s Taxonomy Level

This table details the mapping of the unit content and unit learning outcomes to the PLOs and graduate attributes at the corresponding Bloom’s Taxonomy level, specified by the number in the table.

 

Integrated Specification /

Program Learning Outcomes

PLO 1

PLO 2

PLO 3

PLO 4

PLO 5

Unit Learning Outcomes

LO1

6

6

6

6

-

LO2

5

5

5

-

-

LO3

6

6

6

-

-

LO4

5

5

5

-

-

LO5

5

5

5

5

5

LO6

5

5

5

-

-

LO7

6

6

6

6

6

Unit Study

Assessments

6

6

6

6

6

Lectures/Tutorials

6

6

6

6

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Max Bloom’s level

6

6

6

6

6

Total PLO coverage

9

9

9

8

6

 

Student Assessment 

Assessment Type

(e.g. Assignment - 2000 word essay (specify topic)

Examination (specify length and format))

When assessed

(e.g. After Topic 5)

Weighting

(% of total unit marks)

Learning Outcomes Assessed

Assignment 1

Type: Report / Group work / Short answer questions / Case study

(combination of short problems and short essay questions demonstrating understanding of body of knowledge on electrical and instrumentation theory and its application)

Example topics: To be suggested by lecturer

After Topic 4

25%

1,2,3

Assignment 2

Type: Report / Short Problems / Research / Paper / Case Study / Site Visit / Problem analysis / Project / Professional recommendation

Example topics: To be suggested by lecturer

After Topic 8

25%

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7

Assignment 3 - Final Project (Typical thesis 4000 words, excluding references, figures and tables)

Example Topic: “Factory Automation Plan and Design”

After Topic 10

30%

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Practical Participation

Example: May be in the form of quizzes, class tests, practical assessments, remote labs, simulation software or case studies

Continuous

15%            

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Attendance / Tutorial Participation            

Example: Presentation, discussion, group work, exercises, self-assessment/reflection, case study analysis, application.

Continuous

5%            

-

 

Prescribed and recommended readings

 

Required textbooks

  • Measurement and Instrumentation - Theory and Application, Author(s) / Editor(s)Morris, Alan S.; Langari, Reza, Publisher Elsevier, Copyright Date2012, ISBN978-0-12-381960-4, Electronic ISBN978-0-12-381962-8
  • Electrical Engineering for Non-Electrical Engineers (2nd Edition), Author(s) / Editor(s)Rauf, S. Bobby, Publisher Fairmont Press, Inc. Copyright Date2017, ISBN978-0-88173-777-6, Electronic ISBN978-1-5231-0582-3

 

Reference Materials

  1. Boyes (Ed.), Instrumentation Reference Handbook, 4th Edition – Basic Principles of Industrial Automation, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2010. ISBN  978-0750683081
  2. Lamb, Industrial Automation: Hands On, McGraw-Hill Education, 2013. ISBN 978-0071816458
  3. Manesis and G. Nikolakopoulos, Introduction to Industrial Automation, CRC Press, 2018, ISBN 978-1498705400
  4. Gupta, S. K. Arora, and J. R. Westcott, Industrial Automation and Robotics: An Introduction, Mercury Learning & Information, 2016. ISBN 978-1938549304.
  5. L. S. Sharma, Overview of Industrial Process Automation, 2nd Edition, Elsevier, 2011. ISBN 978-0323165389
  6. Mazin-I-Khalil, Learn Industrial Automation, Lynda.com (LinkedIn Learning), 2018. [Online], Available: https://www.lynda.com/Software-Development-tutorials/Welcome/661768/713349-4.html
  7. M. Bartelt, Industrial Automated Systems: Instrumentation and Motion Control, Cengage Learning, 2010. ISBN 978-1435488885
  8. Döbler, Mario Großmann, Tim. (2019). Data Visualization with Python. Packt Publishing. Retrieved from: https://app.knovel.com/hotlink/toc/id:kpDVP00001/data-visualization-with/data-visualization-with

 

Number of peer-reviewed journals and websites (advised during lectures). Some examples are listed below.

  • IDC notes and Reference texts as advised by the lecturer.
  • Other material advised during the lectures
  • Cheng, Y., Zhang, Y., Ji, P., Xu, W., Zhou, Z. and Tao, F., 2018. Cyber-physical integration for moving digital factories forward towards smart manufacturing: a survey. The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 97(1-4), pp.1209-1221.
  • Issaoui, Y., Khiat, A., Bahnasse, A. and Ouajji, H., 2020. Toward Smart Logistics: Engineering Insights and Emerging Trends. Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering, pp.1-28.
  • Li, X., Li, D., Wan, J., Vasilakos, A.V., Lai, C.F. and Wang, S., 2017. A review of industrial wireless networks in the context of industry 4.0. Wireless networks23(1), pp.23-41

 

Unit Content:

One topic is delivered per contact week, with the exception of part-time 24-week units, where one topic is delivered every two weeks.

Topic 1

Introduction

  1. What is Industry Automation (OT vs IT, Industrial Internet of Things, network topologies)
  2. Industry sectors (eg Oil & Gas, Mining & Mineral Processing, Utilities, Pulp & Paper, Manufacturing, Transport, Agriculture, Construction) and associated major process and utility equipment
  3. Typical Automation Applications (examples across the sectors including robotics, autonomous vehicles, factory automation, materials handling etc)
  4. Measurement and control theory introduction
  5. Sensors
  6. Signal transmission
  7. Control systems (PLC, DCS, SCADA), Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS)
  8. Control elements (eg valves, drives, actuators, positioners)
  9. Communications (Ethernet, cable, fibre, Mobile-NextG, UHF/VHF radio, VSAT / BGAN) and examples for process control system and SCADA applications

Topics 2

Electrical Engineering for Industrial Automation

  1. What is electricity
  2. Units of measurement
  3. Current flow (AC, DC)
  4. Ohm's law
  5. Simple circuits
  6. Kirchoff’s voltage law
  7. Kirchoff’s current law
  8. Power
  9. Cable volt drop
  10. Electrical system overview (generation, transmission, distribution)
  11. Drives and drive control (fixed, stepped and fully variable speed, interlocks)

 

Topics 3

Python Programming for Industrial Automation

  1. Overview of Engineering Programming in Industrial Automation
  2. Python Basics (Basic Operation, Syntax, setting up environment, variables, nesting)
  3. Datatypes (integers, strings, lists)
  4. Numpy Arrays and mathematics
  5. Conditionals, Errors and Looping
  6. Data Analysis with pandas
  7. Visualization with Matplotlib
  8.  Functions and Modules
  9.  Object Oriented Programming
  10. Take home exercises: Industrial Automation

Topics 4 and 5

Instrument Engineering for Industrial Automation

  1. Measurement (temperature, pressure, level, flow, product quality, position, count)
  2. Simple instrument loop (sensor, conditioning / amplification, transmission, display, recording)
  3. Pneumatic instruments
  4. Electrical / electronic instruments
  5. Digital / smart instruments
  6. Calibration, range, span, accuracy, linearization
  7. Signal transmission (conventional, Fieldbus, Wireless)

 

Topic 6

Safety Overview

  1. Code of Hammurabi
  2. Safety acts, regulations, standards, codes of practices
  3. What goes wrong and why
  4. OHS vs process safety
  5. Hazard identification
  6. Risk assessment
  7. Hierarchy of safety studies

 

Topic 7

Regulations, Acts, Codes and Standards

  1. Professional ethics
  2. Laws and regulations
  3. Codes and standards
  4. Industry practice
  5. Engineering discipline, skills and competency, continuous professional development
  6. Managing new technology

 

Topic 8

Automation Planning and Project Management

  1. Capital stewardship process and activities, front end loading
  2. Project management overview, project planning (activities and key deliverables linked to capital stewardship and FEL process)
  3. Framing and benchmarking
  4. Automation lifecycle: Design; Build; Test; Install; Commission and Operate
  5. Scope of work, WBS, schedule and budget
  6. Quality management

 

Topics 9 and 10

Project and Asset Documentation

  1. Document hierarchy and development
  2. User requirements
  3. Functional and technical specifications
  4. Scope of work
  5. Installation, test and commissioning documentation
  6. Documentation for operations
  7. High level drawings - eg PFD, mass balance and P&IDs for process sector
  8. Plant layouts
  9. Single line diagrams
  10. Control system topology drawings
  11. Functional logic diagrams (eg motor control circuit)
  12. Sequence flow charts
  13. Electrical schematics for motor control circuit
  14. Instrument loop drawings
  15. Database tools

 

Topic 11

Data Communications

  1. Overview of Communication technologies
  2. Design and selection considerations

 

 

Topic 12

Advanced Study Case Studies – drawn from examples in

  1. Large scale industrial automation
  2. Industry 4.0 concepts (Smart Manufacturing, Smart Logistics and supply chain management, Smart Sensor Nodes, Deployment of Robotics)
  3. Autonomous Vehicles
  4. Machine Learning

 

 

Project and Course Review

In the final week students will have an opportunity to review the contents covered so far. Opportunity will be provided for a review of student work, to clarify any outstanding issues, and to work on finalising the major assessment report.

Software/Hardware Used

Software

  • VPLabs

  • v12
  • Instruction update 11/09/2019 - v2.4

Hardware

  •  N/A